Tag: ERM

ERM — Rethinking vendor management

Vendor management is becoming an area of increased focus for risk managers. The operational, financial, and regulatory risks third-party vendors and contractors pose to an organization continue to expand unabated. Despite the magnitude of the threat posed from lax vendor management programs, many risk managers do not feel their organizations have the technology and capabilities in place to properly face the challenge.

A Deloitte study notes that 94% of responding executives have only low to moderate levels of confidence in the tools and technology they use to manage third-party risk. Nearly 90% have similar lack of confidence in the quality of the underlying risk management process. Armed with dubious solutions and processes, risk managers fighting for effective vendor management assessment may find it an uphill battle.

The status quo may not hold

Recent New York Times coverage of the dire supply chain effects Hurricane Maria had on the availability of critical prescriptions in the U.S. illustrates how quickly vendor management issues can escalate. The article notes, “Federal officials and major drugmakers are scrambling to prevent national shortages of critical drugs for treating cancer, diabetes and heart disease, as well as medical devices and supplies, that are manufactured at 80 plants in hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico.”

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Wrestling with ERM’s ROI

Trying to determine the value of enterprise risk management (ERM) is a difficult challenge. A quotation frequently attributed to Albert Einstein (although more likely originally said by sociologist William Bruce Cameron) gets to the crux of the issue: “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted.”

Issues with measuring ERM value

Donna Galer, writing for the Insurance Thought Leadership blog, summarizes the reasons why the value of ERM programs are not easily quantified:

  • It is extremely hard to know when a loss did not happen because of ERM.
  • It is just as hard to quantify the cost of loss that did not happen.
  • It is difficult to quantify the “soft” benefits of enhanced reputation because ERM is practiced or because of improved strategic alignment in the organization; ERM requires an understanding of the company’s strategic goals and objectives to identify the risks that might derail their achievement.
  • It is often hard to justify the time and expense of measuring something that is not easy to measure.

Determining the objective value of a prevented loss or improved strategic alignment is highly problematic. Despite the very real value associated with those activities, determining a specific value without having an actuary assess probabilities and amounts seems extremely difficult. Not everything that counts can be counted.

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ERM – Moving beyond risk assessments and heat maps

heat maps

Risk assessments and heat maps remain central components in most enterprise risk management (ERM) programs. Yet there is considerable debate about their effectiveness and both tools have no shortage of critics. In 2011 Howard Sklar, a Forbes contributor, outlined one of the most popular criticisms regarding companies that viewed risk assessments as a document instead of a process. He noted, “Companies that fail in this way are often trying to check the risk-assessment box on their program. That’s fine, as far as it goes. At first glance, a risk assessment seems like a low-ROI effort. You put in time and potentially money, and you get back a piece of paper laying out what you already know.

Similarly, others deride heat maps as nothing more than “colorful guesses.” Brian Priezkalns, in the not-too-subtly titled article, Why I hate Heat Maps, says “Heat maps are just a terrible terrible terrible way to understand, communicate about, and decide how to respond to risks. They either mess up what you already knew, or they hide the fact you are too ignorant to make a rational decision. Everything that can be done with heat maps would be done better with actual numbers.”

If these tools have such fierce critics, then why are they still central to most ERM programs? In this article, we’ll examine what drives the limitations, and the key missing ingredient that turns them into powerful assets.

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Creating a Successful ERM Program: Why Ditching Spreadsheets Isn’t Enough

Technology is often the first thing risk managers turn to when seeking to enhance enterprise risk management (ERM) programs. The appeal of leaving behind a jumble of spreadsheets and manual processes for a single, dedicated ERM workhorse is undeniable. Yet, without the right context to shape the selection process, a new technology solution may not help at all. In fact, it could even make matters worse.

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Avoiding Common ERM Pitfalls

Connecting the many pieces of ERM

Given the continuing discussion on the new ISO and COSO updates, and the lively “Great Debate,” we recently sat down with Michael Yip, Vice President, Risk Management with DFW International Airport to get his thoughts about the new Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) framework updates. With over 20 years of strategic management consulting experience, his frequent speaking engagements and thought leadership on ERM, and his extensive history of domestic and international assignments implementing corporate governance and compliance initiatives dating back to first generation COSO and ISO, he is an ideal choice for this topic.

It quickly became apparent, however, that merely adding to an ever-growing collection of “Which framework is right for you?” articles was not something that he was entirely interested in pursuing. In fact, he found the situation that the industry is still wrestling with frameworks, after all this time, “problematic” as it entirely circumvents the strategic conversation about ERM. So, we had that discussion instead.

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