Tag: Culture

A Stranger is Calling — The impact of RMIS service team turnover

How many members of your current RMIS vendor’s service team have come and gone over the course of your relationship? What about the number of service team leads who have guided support efforts on behalf of you and the other users of your RMIS software?

When you dial into a meeting and get introduced to yet another service team replacement, your RMIS provider is under-delivering.

Many business-to-business software providers place far too much emphasis on “software” and not enough on “service.” In terms of features and functionalities, the results of such an approach may be impressive. But the imbalance comes with a cost. Subpar support is always detrimental to client success.

The importance of consistent, knowledgeable RMIS technology support is difficult to overstate. Given the increasingly complex risks every business faces and the ever-expanding role risk managers play within their organizations, a platform implemented five or more years ago may struggle to keep pace with an organization’s changing needs. A revolving door of service team personnel who need to be brought up to speed on the unique aspects of a RMIS and the risk management program it was put into place to support compounds the problem.

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How to avoid the new OSHA “culture penalty”

Creating a strong safety culture can be challenging for any organization. Recent regulatory changes are placing an organization’s safety culture under additional scrutiny. In the EHS Today article The Risks of Using Injury and Illness Reporting as Measurements of Success, Mark Kozeal discusses how an OSHA rule change penalizes those with cultures that discourage reporting.

“Under OSHA’s update to its 2016 rule on recording and reporting workplace injuries and illnesses, such programs would be in violation of the law,” Kozeal notes. “Whether this incentivized culture was purposeful or inadvertent doesn’t matter. What matters is that any practice that incentivizes employees for not reporting an injury or illness or denies employees incentives if they report an illness or injury, can now be cited by OSHA.” This means that a poor safety culture can now affect the bottom line.

First steps to avoiding the “culture penalty”

Now that there is the possibility of additional regulatory costs associated with failing to create a strong safety culture, the importance of near-miss reporting is multiplied. As we discussed in Using RMIS technology to improve incident and near miss reporting, two factors are essential to developing a healthy safety reporting culture:

There is no quick fix when it comes addressing the factors that inhibit reporting. However, taking a number of practical steps that include making it easier to submit reports (addressing practicality) and allowing for anonymous reporting (reducing fear) can be a foundation upon which to build an effective safety program. With more data to draw from, the ability of risk managers and safety professionals to identify, analyze, and take strategic action to reduce the likelihood of injury is vastly improved. Over time, this can contribute to a breakdown in perceptions of uselessness and acceptance of risk.

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Build a culture of safety — go beyond audits and get employees involved

For risk and safety professionals, the new calendar year brings with it a renewed focus on improving their organization’s culture of safety. Whether looking to put a new safety program in place, make wholesale changes to an existing program, or build upon previous successes, many organizations face the challenge of ensuring that their employees are fully participating in safety efforts.

A recent EHS Today article takes a look at a potential solution for involving people across an organization in this process: safety assessments.

How safety assessments differ from safety audits

To Build Safety Culture, You Must Get People Talking provides an overview of a 2018 Safety Leadership Conference session — “Distracted Drivers R US — Assessment RX for Success” — led by Walter Fluharty, vice president of EHS and organizational development at Ohio-based Simon Roofing.

Where static surveys may be seen as yet another safety-related requirement, focus group-based assessments followed by the completion of self-assessments are more likely to drive engagement and add value.
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Take risks. Be rewarded.

The idea of rowing across an ocean still eludes me—despite my frequent conversations with crew members from the Origami Risk-sponsored rowing team about their aspirations to achieve such a feat.

Watch this video about the Origami Risk rowing team

I’ve learned about the difference between rudders and sterns; the need for leg strength, even more so than upper-body strength; and how the ballast helps improve the stability of the boat to help prevent flipping and sinking. read more

Community giving is another way to manage risk

The average age of an insurance professional is 59, according to a McKinsey and Company study that highlights the not-so-far-off retirement of a vast group of individuals in the insurance industry. The forthcoming churn could mean a depletion of institutional knowledge from organizations if they don’t have younger employees in place to absorb industry veterans’ knowledge before they exit the workforce.

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