Category: RMIS

Three trends from the 2020 Origami Risk User Conference

Origami Risk users gathered in San Antonio from January 12-16 for our 2020 User Conference. The fifth such event hosted by Origami, this iteration of the conference was the largest to date, with more than 500 people representing organizations from across the risk and insurance industry in attendance.

Collaborative, hands-on learning opportunities led by members of the Origami service team ranged from “boot camps”—introductions to the system for newer users—to instruction on setting up dashboards and reports to more advanced topics such as system administration. Attendees also had the opportunity to meet with an Origami expert for one-on-one sessions for a closer look at specific features or areas of the system they wanted to know more about.

Client co-presenters led sessions covering a wide range of topics including GRC, underwriting, safety, audits, and claims administration, to name just a few. As in previous years, the delivery of actual use cases and the opportunity for those attending sessions to ask questions about the ways in which Origami Risk is being used to address “real world” challenges provided a unique opportunity for peer-to-peer learning. read more

Why the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) may be the tip of the regulatory iceberg for compliance

On January 1, 2020, a new California regulation went into effect that may push many unsuspecting enterprises doing business in the state into costly noncompliance while also introducing reputational risk and threatening their brands. The California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) grants new consumer rights related to data storage, use, and protection. Companies failing to comply with these rules can be fined up to $7,500 for each violation. Despite the potential impacts, a recent survey by the IT security firm ESET shows how ill-prepared most enterprises are regarding this new compliance obligation:

  • Nearly half of all respondents had never heard of CCPA
  • More than 8 in 10 respondents did not know if the law even applied to their business
  • A third of executives were unsure if their organizations needed to change how consumer data was stored/processed
  • Nearly 1 in 4 respondents “didn’t care” about becoming compliant
  • More than half had not performed a risk assessment on cybersecurity within the past year

Given the stakes involved, this broad lack of urgency is concerning but not all that surprising. A DataGrail survey indicated that despite investing thousands of hours and being given a two-year head start, only half of the companies reported achieving compliance with the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), a similar data privacy regulation in Europe. Additionally, 70% of enterprises admitted the systems they were currently using to comply would not scale. When the pace of regulatory change is accelerating so rapidly, most enterprises are being caught flat-footed.

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The power of portals: How public entities are improving reporting and delivering next-level services

Female worker in front of van with mobile device

Failure to report incidents and safety hazards can have wide-ranging ramifications, impacting employees and their families, public agencies, and the community as a whole. Making work, and workplaces, safer requires the cooperation of everyone—staff, employees, and citizens.

User-friendly and easily accessible tools such as custom risk portals and mobile forms can streamline any project that requires the capture of data—from exposure values and certificates of insurance (COI) details to driver certification information and more. Made available to employees and members of the public for the reporting of incidents, hazards, and near misses, portals and mobile forms help simplify and standardize what is often an arduous and inefficient process. This not only makes reporting these types of events more likely, but also for a more efficient and accurate reporting process.

Making it easier for employees and members of the public to report accidents, damage, and potential hazards has numerous benefits. Among them, a reduction in administrative overhead and decreased lags in reporting, as well as improved transparency and trust. Perhaps most importantly, access to this data can help risk managers and safety professionals identify trends and take proactive, strategic action to reduce future losses or eliminate them altogether.

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Are you and your RMIS ready for change?

Heracleitus says, you know, that all things move and nothing remains still, and he likens the universe to the current of a river, saying that you cannot step twice into the same stream. — Plato, Cratylus

Regardless of industry or company size, an evolving risk environment necessitates an approach to managing risk that is both strategic and dynamic. In order to successfully implement a risk management program that accounts for this reality, you’ll need the right risk management technology—and the appropriate level of support behind it.

Is your RMIS capable of keeping up?

Platform flexibility allows organizations to tailor workflows that adapt to changes in risk and safety processes, rather than the other way around. And although it’s not uncommon to have concerns about changing systems, the move to a more configurable RMIS typically contributes to significant leaps forward in data collection, analysis, compliance, and day-to-day efficiency.

A case study featuring DHL, the world’s leading postal and logistics company, details the benefits that can come from making a switch to a more configurable RMIS. Following a change to Origami Risk from the legacy system previously used to centralize its loss and risk information, DHL saw rapid improvements in accident reporting, the handling of claims data, policy management, and document management. The DHL risk management team was also able to take advantage of Origami’s flexibility to set up an integration with daily video feeds from delivery vehicle dash-cams.

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So bad you’ll never leave? 4 reasons for making a RMIS switch

In “Bad Decision Family,” a classic sketch from the 16th season of Saturday Night Live, guest host Tom Hanks, playing the father of the family, joins his wife (Jan Hooks) and children (Julia Sweeney, Mike Myers) at the kitchen table for “leftover night.” Hanks has just retrieved milk from the refrigerator. Upon taking a seat, he drinks directly from the carton. “Oh! Oh, geez!” he cries out in disgust. “How old is that milk? It is really bad!” Hooks asks to see for herself, and reacts similarly after taking a sip. To a mixture of laughter and moans from the live audience, Sweeney and Myers eagerly follow suit. As the sketch continues, each member of the family takes turns joining in on bad decision after bad decision: sniffing a plate of bad fish, sitting on a sharp nail, and testing out a broken staircase to the basement, to name just a few.

The sketch works because it illustrates our tendency as human beings to willingly opt-in for experiences that are guaranteed to be less than optimal. This phenomenon holds true when it comes to the performance of risk management information system (RMIS) software and support.

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4 ways a RMIS can help manage supply chain risk

Supply chain management has always come with a wide range of risks—from capacity issues to operational disruption to inheriting the risks of a supplier. Recently, raw material shortages, climate change, and trade wars have come to the forefront of concerns. Regardless of a company’s size or the proximity of its suppliers, it’s likely to feel the impact of global risks like these. Risk managers are taking note. In Lockton’s 2018 Risk Management Survey, supply risk was among the top issues risk managers wanted to discuss more within their organizations.

As supply chains become more complex, so does the management of related risks. Manual management techniques or legacy technology previously used in performing the job may not work for addressing today’s challenges. “To make the best decisions, managers need access to real-time data about their supply chain, but the limitations of legacy technologies can thwart the goal of end-to-end transparency,” states the Harvard Business Review article The Death of Supply Chain Management.

Using the right technology, risk management teams and supply chain teams can take control. A fully integrated risk management information system (RMIS) with built-in automation and data analytics can help eliminate manual labor, increase efficiency, and allow for more accurate predictions. Ultimately, this can save companies money, and aid in avoiding supply disruptions that could take a business under or severely damage its reputation. (Read more about the far-reaching consequences of reputational damage due to supply chain failures.)

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3 ways a RMIS can enhance fleet management

Increased rates of accident severity. Rising claim costs. Insurance coverage that is either more expensive or harder to secure. As risk managers grapple with these and other fleet management challenges, measures such as a renewed focus on training and driver safety, an improved understanding of the cause of accidents that lead to claims, and the ability to pull together a complete and accurate list of fleet exposure values are essential components in reducing fleet-related costs.

Given the range of departments and the number of people typically involved in the management of fleet vehicles, implementing and measuring the efficacy of such initiatives is easier said than done. By extension, the number of software systems, spreadsheets, and paper-based processes an organization uses to capture and store fleet-related data can make it difficult to monitor progress, identify trends, and report on successes. By consolidating this data in a central location that is linked to claims, policies, certifications, training records, and more, a RMIS can help better manage the risks associated with a commercial fleet.

#1 A RMIS can consolidate all fleet vehicle data

Data silos are an all-too-common issue for many organizations. This can hold especially true for those with an extensive fleet of vehicles, whether owned or leased, that directly employ or contract with drivers.

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Origami Risk Named Among Chicago’s Best and Brightest Companies to Work For®

CHICAGO⁠—Origami Risk has been recognized as one of “Chicago’s Best and Brightest Companies to Work For®” by the National Association for Business Resources (NABR). The award marks the fourth consecutive year Origami Risk has been cited by NABR, including national honors and previous awards in Chicago and Atlanta. In gaining this recognition, Origami Risk now has earned over 20 workplace awards in recent years. The honors showcase its commitment to hire and retain the insurance industry’s top talent to provide the highest level of service to its customers.

“We’re honored to be recognized again by the National Association of Business Resources,” said Jon Nichols, chief operating officer, Origami Risk. “Our focus on delivering the highest quality of customer service has always depended on our ability to attract and retain the industry’s most talented people as well as to support them with the environment, tools and culture they need to be successful.”

According to NABR, only companies that distinguish themselves as having the most innovative and thoughtful human resources approach can be bestowed this honor. An independent research firm evaluates each company’s entry, based on key measures in various categories. They include: Compensation, Benefits and Employee Solutions; Employee Enrichment, Engagement and Retention; Employee Education and Development; Recruitment, Selection and Orientation; Employee Achievement and Recognition; Communication and Shared Vision; Diversity and Inclusion; Work-Life Balance; Community Initiatives; and Strategic Company Performance.

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ERM – Moving beyond enterprise risk assessments and risk heat maps

Enterprise risk assessment and risk heat map in the risk management process

Risk assessments and heat maps remain central components in most enterprise risk management (ERM) programs. Yet there is considerable debate about their effectiveness and both tools have no shortage of critics. In 2011 Howard Sklar, a Forbes contributor, outlined one of the most popular criticisms regarding companies that viewed risk assessments as a document instead of a risk management process. He noted, “Companies that fail in this way are often trying to check the risk-assessment box on their program. That’s fine, as far as it goes. At first glance, a risk assessment seems like a low-ROI effort. You put in time and potentially money, and you get back a piece of paper laying out what you already know.

Similarly, others deride heat maps as nothing more than “colorful guesses.” Brian Priezkalns, in the not-too-subtly titled article, Why I hate Heat Maps, says “Heat maps are just a terrible terrible terrible way to understand, communicate about, and decide how to respond to risks. They either mess up what you already knew, or they hide the fact you are too ignorant to make a rational decision. Everything that can be done with heat maps would be done better with actual numbers.”

If the risk assessment and risk heat map have such fierce critics, then why are they still central to most ERM programs? In this article, we’ll examine what drives the limitations, and the key missing ingredient that turns them into powerful assets. read more

Origami Risk is One of Inc. Magazine’s Best Workplaces 2019

Origami Risk has been named one of Inc. magazine’s Best Workplaces for 2019, the magazine’s fourth annual ranking in the fast-growing private company sector. In gaining this recognition for the second consecutive year, Origami Risk now has earned 19 workplace awards in recent years. The honors showcase its commitment to hire and retain the insurance industry’s top talent to provide the highest level of service to its customers.

Hitting newsstands in the June 2019 issue, and as part of a prominent Inc.com feature, the list is the result of a wide-ranging and comprehensive measurement of private American companies that have created exceptional workplaces through vibrant cultures, deep employee engagement, and stellar benefits. Collecting data on nearly 2,000 submissions, Inc. singled out 346 finalists.

Each nominated company took part in an employee survey, conducted by Omaha’s Quantum Workplace, on topics including trust, management effectiveness, perks, and confidence in the future. Inc. gathered, analyzed, and audited the data. They then ranked all the employers using a composite score of survey results. This year, 74.2 percent of surveyed employees were engaged by their work—besting last year’s 72.1 percent.

The strongest engagement scores came from companies that prioritize the most human elements of work. These companies are leading the way in employee recognition, performance management, and diversity. It’s a different playbook from a decade ago, when too many firms used the same template: free food, open work environments, and artifacts of “fun.”

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