Category: Healthcare

Issue Management: What Happens When Everything Starts Going Wrong?

The economy is reopening whether organizations are prepared or not. What does restarting business operations look like in a world reeling from a pandemic outbreak and the problems that come with it?

A staggering 40% of businesses fail to reopen following a disaster and another 25% fail within one year following a disaster, according to a report published by Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Even organizations that survive disasters can remain fragile, experiencing disruption for years to come. While FEMA’s statistics were built upon “normal” disruptions—hurricanes, tornadoes, floods—we can see how impactful contained disasters are to businesses, leaving the world to wonder what impact the coronavirus outbreak will have on the global economy.

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The True Challenge of COVID-19 Solutions in Healthcare: Q&A with Bill Schwacke & Jaime Henry

While a world-wide trend in developing resources and solutions for coronavirus has proved fruitful, the healthcare industry is inundated with massive day-to-day challenges, leaving little-to-no room for implementation.

The healthcare industry is undoubtedly at the forefront of the global battle against COVID-19. However, the overwhelming nature of the pandemic on health organizations has become apparent, and from it, a realization that tools and solutions that were once viewed as a luxury are now a necessity for preparedness.

Origami’s Bill Schwacke, Senior Sales Executive, and Jaime Henry, Senior Market Strategy Lead – Healthcare, discuss making sense of the overabundance of resources, how solutions like Origami Risk’s stand to solve organizations’ many coronavirus challenges, and why implementation mid-pandemic might not be an option, but preparing for the future is.

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How Companies Can Support Their Employees (and Clients) During COVID-19

Globally, we are seeing companies being pushed into having a remote workforce, whether they are ready for it or not, especially as more US states and countries issue shelter-in-place orders to slow the spread of COVID-19. While shifting to a remote workforce may seem like an impossible feat, there are steps you can begin taking now to help your employees transition, and by extension, improve the experience of your clients. Since our inception, Origami Risk has valued its remote capabilities and the talented team we’ve been able to curate because of it.

Whether you are a work-from-home veteran or not, we’re all facing unique challenges in this new environment—from learning to work alongside your spouse and kids, to dealing with the challenges of conferencing technology—there is always a learning curve when transitioning from office to home. As a company of “remote work gurus,” we’d like to help make that learning curve a little shorter by sharing what helps Origami’s dispersed team efficiently work from home, all while servicing clients without interruption.

Have Readily Available Resources and Training

Some employees have fully equipped home offices, while others may have difficulty adjusting to their new work environment for a number of reasons. From a lack of technological savvy, difficulty working without a second monitor, or simply the social adjustment that comes with telecommuting, there are a number of obstacles that can work against an organization that’s suddenly forced to shift to a fully-remote workforce. First and foremost, it’s important to check in with employees to make sure they’re equipped with the tools and resources needed to effectively work and service their clients.

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Three trends from the 2020 Origami Risk User Conference

Origami Risk users gathered in San Antonio from January 12-16 for our 2020 User Conference. The fifth such event hosted by Origami, this iteration of the conference was the largest to date, with more than 500 people representing organizations from across the risk and insurance industry in attendance.

Collaborative, hands-on learning opportunities led by members of the Origami service team ranged from “boot camps”—introductions to the system for newer users—to instruction on setting up dashboards and reports to more advanced topics such as system administration. Attendees also had the opportunity to meet with an Origami expert for one-on-one sessions for a closer look at specific features or areas of the system they wanted to know more about.

Client co-presenters led sessions covering a wide range of topics including GRC, underwriting, safety, audits, and claims administration, to name just a few. As in previous years, the delivery of actual use cases and the opportunity for those attending sessions to ask questions about the ways in which Origami Risk is being used to address “real world” challenges provided a unique opportunity for peer-to-peer learning. read more

Create a High-Reliability Hospital with Healthcare Risk Management Software

Hospitals and healthcare systems looking to prioritize patient and employee safety often phrase their initiative as a way to reduce adverse events. The word “reduce” implies that the number of adverse events can be lowered but not eliminated entirely. It implies that some adverse events are simply unavoidable.

But what if organizations changed their mindset? What if the end goal was, in fact, to eliminate adverse events? A hospital without patient safety events may seem like an impossibility, but as more and more organizations are learning, zero harm doesn’t have to be a miracle scenario.

“Many hospitals are embracing the values of high-reliability organizations and occupations like air traffic control towers, nuclear power plants, wildlife fire fighters and astronauts,” states the article 5 Traits of High Reliability Organizations: How to Hardwire Each in Your Organization. “The paradigm works remarkably well in the promotion of patient safety and efficient healthcare delivery.”

High reliability organizations are organizations that operate in complex, high-hazard domains for extended periods without serious accidents or catastrophic failures…High reliability organizations cultivate resilience by relentlessly prioritizing safety over other performance pressures. – Patient Safety Network’s Patient Safety Primer

Where to Start

According to Anne Marie Benedicto, vice president of the Joint Commission Center for Transformation Healthcare, although hospital and healthcare staff may desire to become a high-reliability organization, they often don’t know how to begin. “Transforming to high reliability is a multiyear process,” she said in a Q&A with Becker’s Hospital Review. “And it is probably the biggest change initiative any healthcare organization can undertake right now.”

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4 Areas of Focus for Improving the Patient Experience

In an age where customer experience reigns supreme, the healthcare industry is beginning to view processes and outcomes through a similar lens. Hospitals and healthcare systems are businesses. Patients are customers. And customers must have a positive experience in order to continue using the services of a business. Patient experience is a term often applied broadly to initiatives such as reducing hospital stay length and readmission rates, cutting down incidences of patient safety events, and ensuring patients feel seen and heard.

In an effort to get a hold of this new way of thinking, hospitals are adding patient experience leaders to their staff and also considering the myriad sources that impact the patient experience. Risk managers and patient safety professionals have a unique opportunity to champion patient experience efforts for their organizations. Here are four areas of focus for improving the patient experience with the help of risk management best practices.

1. Get the whole organization involved and invested

With a far-reaching goal like improving patient experience, healthcare organizations will see greater success when they establish a targeted strategy and communicate that strategy clearly across all departments. In many cases, it may make sense to establish an enterprise risk management (ERM) program to make headway. As mentioned in GRC: Where to start? Productive healthcare ERM tools, “Healthcare ERM establishes a standardized framework for identifying risk across an organization, encourages cross-departmental collaboration, and shifts hospitals from a reactive clinical risk program to a proactive holistic risk management program.”

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The many layers of risk management in healthcare

Risk management in healthcare consists of many layers

Risk management in healthcare has especially high stakes. In addition to risks related to operations, finances, and reputation, healthcare organizations must consider those that can be a matter of life or death. Hospitals and health systems work tirelessly to ensure the health and safety of their patients. The right healthcare risk management software will help them achieve that goal.

No matter what an organization hopes to improve—from claims management to incident reporting to clinical rounding—an integrated healthcare risk management information system (RMIS) offers the right solutions for improving patient well-being and finding organization-wide success. Read more about the many aspects of risk management in healthcare.

  • Patient Safety & Quality
  • Claims & Insurance
  • Healthcare Enterprise Risk Management (ERM)

Patient Safety & Quality

Medical error is the third-leading cause of death in the United States. This includes process errors, planning errors, and failures to act. With the right reporting and workflow tools, integrated healthcare risk management software eliminates human error and allows clinicians to work in lockstep to provide better patient care.

Incident Reporting

To effectively address adverse events and near misses, hospital risk managers need an informed understanding of what constitutes such incidents. This starts with having the technology to efficiently report them. Integrated data tools—such as data surveillance, patient safety event reporting, and enterprise-wide near miss/unsafe condition reporting—that contain simplified forms with clear instructions make data collection efficient and straightforward.

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Hospital staff burnout, part 2: How healthcare ERM can prevent burnout

As the hospital burnout crisis continues to make headlines, healthcare organizations are in need not only of solutions that address the consequences of burnout, but also strategies for preventing burnout in the first place. As discussed in part 1 of this series, the right healthcare risk management technology can play a role in efforts to ensure physicians are more fully engaged. Physicians who feel connected to the core purpose of their work are less likely to burn out, and more likely provide quality patient care.

Another approach to addressing clinician burnout is the establishment of an organization-wide plan to monitor, analyze, and, ultimately, prevent the condition from occurring. Efforts to mitigate burnout will likely come from many directions within an organization, but to streamline the process and get everyone on the same page, a logical but perhaps unexpected place to start is with the hospital risk management team. Healthcare risk managers can play a crucial role in successfully preventing burnout by viewing burnout like the other risks they manage, developing a healthcare enterprise risk management (ERM) framework, and leveraging the technology they already work with on a daily basis.

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Healthcare administration: The vital role of healthcare risk management

Those working in the healthcare industry are no strangers to constant change. A healthcare risk management program and the right technology can help to effectively monitor risk across specialties and improve patient safety. Origami Risk’s Bill Schwacke spoke to Future of Personal Health about the intersection of risk management and the healthcare industry.

Risk management software is used in various industries. How is it applied to healthcare?
Risk management software is at the center of a healthcare organization’s approach to risk, safety, claims, and insurance. The software can define the provider’s approach to risk by linking, organizing, and distributing data from independent, critical functions to provide an organizational view of risk.

Can you elaborate on the correlation between patient safety and risk management software?
Patient safety and risk management software are often linked due to the nature of the data involved. While they often work independently, there are insights that can be discovered when linked together. These insights can improve quality of care and reduce claims/insurance costs for the organization.

Read the full article in Future of Personal Health.

Hospital staff burnout, part 1: How healthcare risk management software addresses burnout

Workplace burnout has become so common across industries that, as of May 2019, the World Health Organization (WHO) recognizes it as an occupational phenomenon in its International Classification of Diseases Handbook.

In the healthcare industry, burnout is a reality and is described by those on the front line in alarming terms. According to a NEJM Catalyst survey Immunization Against Burnout, “83% of respondents — who are clinicians, clinical leaders, and health care executives — call physician burnout a ‘serious’ or ‘moderate’ problem in their organizations.” Based on survey results like these, a report titled A Crisis in Health Care: A Call to Action on Physician Burnout called physician burnout “a public health crisis.”

Burnout has reached crisis level for many reasons, including its prevalence and its effect on staff turnover. But it’s had unexpected consequences for patient care, as well. A JAMA Internal Medicine study concluded that physician burnout doubled the odds of an adverse patient safety event. According to the report, this includes “unsafe care, unprofessional behaviors, and low patient satisfaction.”

In the first part of a two-part series, we examine the main drivers of hospital staff burnout, its far-reaching consequences for healthcare organizations and patients, and how the right technology can play a key role in reducing its widespread nature.

Understanding burnout and its consequences

The WHO officially defines burnout as “a syndrome conceptualized as resulting from chronic workplace stress that has not been successfully managed. It is characterized by three dimensions:

  • feelings of energy depletion or exhaustion;
  • increased mental distance from one’s job, or feelings of negativism or cynicism related to one’s job
  • reduced professional efficacy.”

Burnout affects clinicians on an individual level, delivering the mental and physical exhaustion mentioned above. Far from being only a staff issue, burnout has profound effects on hospitals and patients.

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