Monthly Archives: Jun 2019

Using healthcare risk management software to help tackle staff burnout, Part 1

Workplace burnout has become so common across industries that, as of May 2019, the World Health Organization (WHO) recognizes it as an occupational phenomenon in its International Classification of Diseases Handbook.

In the healthcare industry, burnout is a reality and is described by those on the front line in alarming terms. According to a NEJM Catalyst survey Immunization Against Burnout, “83% of respondents — who are clinicians, clinical leaders, and health care executives — call physician burnout a ‘serious’ or ‘moderate’ problem in their organizations.” Based on survey results like these, a report titled A Crisis in Health Care: A Call to Action on Physician Burnout called physician burnout “a public health crisis.”

Burnout has reached crisis level for many reasons, including its prevalence and its effect on staff turnover. But it’s had unexpected consequences for patient care, as well. A JAMA Internal Medicine study concluded that physician burnout doubled the odds of an adverse patient safety event. According to the report, this includes “unsafe care, unprofessional behaviors, and low patient satisfaction.”

In the first part of a two-part series, we examine the main drivers of hospital staff burnout, its far-reaching consequences for healthcare organizations and patients, and how the right technology can play a key role in reducing its widespread nature.

Understanding burnout and its consequences

The WHO officially defines burnout as “a syndrome conceptualized as resulting from chronic workplace stress that has not been successfully managed. It is characterized by three dimensions:

  • feelings of energy depletion or exhaustion;
  • increased mental distance from one’s job, or feelings of negativism or cynicism related to one’s job
  • reduced professional efficacy.”

Burnout affects clinicians on an individual level, delivering the mental and physical exhaustion mentioned above. Far from being only a staff issue, burnout has serious effects on hospitals and patients in profound ways.

read more

Origami Risk Named Among Chicago’s Best and Brightest Companies to Work For®

CHICAGO⁠—Origami Risk has been recognized as one of “Chicago’s Best and Brightest Companies to Work For®” by the National Association for Business Resources (NABR). The award marks the fourth consecutive year Origami Risk has been cited by NABR, including national honors and previous awards in Chicago and Atlanta. In gaining this recognition, Origami Risk now has earned over 20 workplace awards in recent years. The honors showcase its commitment to hire and retain the insurance industry’s top talent to provide the highest level of service to its customers.

“We’re honored to be recognized again by the National Association of Business Resources,” said Jon Nichols, chief operating officer, Origami Risk. “Our focus on delivering the highest quality of customer service has always depended on our ability to attract and retain the industry’s most talented people as well as to support them with the environment, tools and culture they need to be successful.”

According to NABR, only companies that distinguish themselves as having the most innovative and thoughtful human resources approach can be bestowed this honor. An independent research firm evaluates each company’s entry, based on key measures in various categories. They include: Compensation, Benefits and Employee Solutions; Employee Enrichment, Engagement and Retention; Employee Education and Development; Recruitment, Selection and Orientation; Employee Achievement and Recognition; Communication and Shared Vision; Diversity and Inclusion; Work-Life Balance; Community Initiatives; and Strategic Company Performance.

read more

How TPAs can tame the onboarding process

The onboarding process can be challenging for both TPAs and their clients. Migrating data from one claims management system to another is often a difficult, resource-draining part of that process. Wesley White’s article 10 Data Migration Best Practices For Any Organization summarizes the extent of the challenge:

Migrating data to a new information management system from multiple sources is a complex and often headache-inducing undertaking. Data migration is often necessary to keep up with technological advancements and industry standards, but it requires great effort. Data from various storage areas—both onsite and in the cloud—must be evaluated, analyzed, cleaned up and organized before it can be combined and reconciled.

The right technology can help to reduce the tremendous burden that data migration places on new clients. It can also transform the onboarding process and showcase the unique insights, savings, and benefits your organization delivers. As White notes, “It doesn’t have to be as hard as you may think to get past these challenges and successfully migrate your data.”

Assisting with the pre-migration phase

Research from the independent research firm Bloor paints an ominous picture of data migration projects. Of these projects, 37% exceed budgets, 67% take longer than expected, and 84% fail to meet expectations. In Why do so many data migration projects end in disaster?, Colin Rickard, a data management director with Experian, is asked to explain the high failure rate. “Often there has just not been enough analysis done at the start, so you end up with a lot of data problems at the end,” he responds.

read more

Eliminate the burden (and costs) of maintaining a workers’ comp state forms library

When does maintaining an up-to-date library of workers’ compensation state forms become too great of a bureaucratic burden for your claims adjusters or administrative staff? The most straightforward response is this: The more states in which your organization handles workers’ comp claims, the greater the challenge of staying on top of form revisions and additions.

Time and resources could certainly be allocated to more important activities. In the International Risk Management Institute, Inc. (IRMI) article Workers Compensation Bureaucracy Drives Costs, Mark Walls and Kimberly George cite training and education as two such examples:

One of the goals of workers compensation regulations is to ensure that injured workers are paid benefits in a timely manner at the correct rate and that they have access to appropriate medical treatment,” write Walls and George. “There was a time when payers had offices located in most states with adjusters handling only that state. Now, with most payers utilizing multistate adjusters, payers must be constantly training and educating their adjusters to ensure that they understand all of the nuisances of the different states that they handle.

For organizations looking to reduce the bureaucratic burdens their adjusters face, Origami Compliance offers a secure, API-based solution that integrates with any claims management system to provide immediate access to a single-source, up-to-date library of state and federal workers’ comp claim forms. Without leaving the claims system, an adjuster can quickly find the right form based on state or category. And when that form is selected, form fields automatically populate with claim data and a PDF version is generated.

read more